Conocimiento, Consciencia, Educacion

MONSANTO GMO SEEDS IN NIGERIA, BREAKING THE AGRICULTURAL CYCLE, COMPLICITY OF UN WORLD FOOD PROGRAM

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Slavko Nissl * January 29, 2017
Nigeria’s Farmers’ Alliance said that ‘Bill Gates has used the UN World Food Program and World Bank to promote and distribute GMO seeds aimed at displacing use of natural seeds in Black Sub-Saharan Africa as the first step of displacing all indigenous farmers, who will be left out with no means of livelihood, while Monsanto (owned by Bill Gates) would have a monopoly of the seed market’.
http://www.globalresearch.ca/monsanto-gmo-seeds-in-nigeria-breaking-the-agricultural-cycle-complicity-of-un-world-food-program/5571539

THE DESTABILIZATION OF AFRICAN AGRICULTURE: USAID BRINGS DEADLY GMO SEEDS TO NORTHERN NIGERIA
Dr. Philip Njemanze * October 22, 2016
Nigerians should be very careful with what is being proposed by USAID to Northern governors because USAID is illegally distributing GMO seeds (deceptively called improved seedlings) to IDPs to plant so that Monsanto and its partners will capture the food security of the Northeast of Nigeria.
The problem is that it has not been understood that the biotechnology companies are the main sponsors of Boko Haram hired to drive away farmers and replace their crops with GMO seeds and permanently enslave and impoverish Nigeria.
https://shar.es/1EObN3

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Conocimiento, Consciencia, Educacion

Top 10 Worst GMO Foods for Your GMO Foods List

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Genetically modified foods (GMO foods) have been shown to cause harm to humans, animals, and the environment, and despite growing opposition, more and more foods continue to be genetically altered. It’s important to note that steering clear of these foods completely may be difficult, and you should merely try to find other sources than your big chain grocer. If produce is certified USDA-organic, it’s non-GMO (or supposed to be!) Also, seek out local farmers and booths at farmer’s markets where you can be ensured that the crops aren’t GMO. Even better, if you are so inclined: Start organic gardening and grow them yourself. Until then, here are the top 10 worst GMO foods for your “do not eat” GMO foods list.

1. Corn

One of the most prominent GMO foods, avoiding corn is a no-brainer. If you’ve watched any food documentary, you know corn is highly modified. “As many as half of all U.S. farms growing corn for Monsanto are using genetically modified corn,” and much of it is intended for human consumption. Monsanto’s GMO corn has been tied to numerous health issues, including weight gain and organ disruption.

2. Soy

Found in tofu, vegetarian products, soybean oil, soy flour, and numerous other products, soy is also modified to resist herbicides. As of now, biotech giant Monsanto still has a tight grasp on the soybean market, with approximately 90 percent of soy being genetically engineered to resist Monsanto’s herbicide Roundup. In one single year, 2006, there was 96.7 million pounds of glyphosate sprayed on soybeans alone.

3. Sugar

According to NaturalNews, genetically-modified sugar beets were introduced to the U.S. market in 2009. Like others, they’ve been modified by Monsanto to resist herbicides. Monsanto has even had USDA and court-related issues with the planting of it’s sugarbeets, being ordered to remove seeds from the soil due to illegal approval.

4. Aspartame

Aspartame is a toxic additive used in numerous food products, and should be avoided for numerous reasons, including the fact that it is created with genetically modified bacteria.

5. Papayas

This one may come as a surprise to all of you tropical-fruit lovers. GMO papayas have been grown in Hawaii for consumption since 1999. Though they can’t be sold to countries in the European Union, they are welcome with open arms in the U.S. and Canada.

6. Canola

One of the most chemically altered foods in the U.S. diet, canola oil is obtained from rapeseed through a series of chemical actions.

7. Cotton

Found in cotton oil, cotton originating in India and China in particular has serious risks.

8. Dairy

Your dairy products may contain growth hormones, since as many as one-fifth of all dairy cows in America are pumped with these hormones. In fact, Monasnto’s health-hazardous rBGH has been banned in 27 countries, but is still in most US cows. If you must drink milk, buy organic.

9. and 10. Zucchini and Yellow Squash

Closely related, these two squash varieties are modified to resist viruses.

The dangers of some of these foods are well-known. The Bt toxin being used in GMO corn, for example, was recently detected in the blood of pregnant women and their babies. But perhaps more frightening are the risks that are still unknown. Even while these foods should be on your GMO foods list so that they are avoided, you can buy 100% organic to be safest.

With little regulation and safety tests performed by the companies doing the genetic modifications themselves, we have no way of knowing for certain what risks these lab-created foods pose to us outside of what we already know.

The best advice: steer clear of them altogether.

Additional Sources:

NaturalNews

 

 

 

by Elizabeth Renter
Posted on July 28, 2012

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Conocimiento, Consciencia, Educacion

Why Is Glyphosate Sprayed on Crops Right Before Harvest?

Glyphosate, the main ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide, is recognized as the world’s most widely used weed killer. What is not so well known is that farmers also use glyphosate on crops such as wheat, oats, edible beans and other crops right before harvest, raising concerns that the herbicide could get into food products.

Escalating Use of Probable Carcinogen

Glyphosate has come under increased scrutiny in the past year. Last year the World Health Organization’s cancer group, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, classified it as a probable carcinogen. The state of California has also moved to classify the herbicide as a probable carcinogen. A growing body of research is documenting health concerns of glyphosate as an endocrine disruptor and that it kills beneficial gut bacteria, damages the DNA in human embryonic, placental and umbilical cord cells and is linked to birth defects and reproductive problems in laboratory animals.

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What is not so well known is that farmers also use glyphosate on crops such as wheat, oats, edible beans and other crops right before harvest.

A recently published paper describes the escalating use of glyphosate: 18.9 billion pounds have been used globally since its introduction in 1974, making it the most widely and heavily applied weed-killer in the history of chemical agriculture. Significantly, 74 percent of all glyphosate sprayed on crops since the mid-1970s was applied in just the last 10 years, as cultivation of GMO corn and soybeans expanded in the U.S. and globally.

Glyphosate Used to Speed Up Wheat Harvest

Charles Benbrook, Ph.D., who published the paper on the mounting use of glyphosate, says the practice of spraying glyphosate on wheat prior to harvest, known as desiccating, began in Scotland in the 1980s.

“Farmers there often had trouble getting wheat and barley to dry evenly so they can start harvesting. So they came up with the idea to kill the crop (with glyphosate) one to two weeks before harvest to accelerate the drying down of the grain,” he said.

The pre-harvest use of glyphosate allows farmers to harvest crops as much as two weeks earlier than they normally would, an advantage in northern, colder regions.

The practice spread to wheat-growing areas of North America such as the upper Midwestern U.S. and Canadian provinces such as Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

“Desiccation is done primarily in years where conditions are wet and the crop is slow to dry down,” Joel Ransom, an agronomist at North Dakota State University, said.

Ransom says desiccating wheat with glyphosate has been a useful tool for farmers.

“It does help hasten dry down and controls grain weeds and other material that slows down the threshing practice,” he said. “It has an important role in areas where it’s wet.”

Ransom says the practice has increased in North Dakota, which is the leading wheat-producing state in the U.S., over the past 15 years due to wetter weather.

While more common in Upper Midwestern states where there is more moisture, desiccation is less likely to be done in drier wheat growing areas of Kansas, Oklahoma, Washington and Oregon.

All Conventional Farmers in Saskatchewan Desiccate Wheat

According to a wheat farmer in Saskatchewan, desiccating wheat with glyphosate is commonplace in his region. “I think every non-organic farmer in Saskatchewan uses glyphosate on most of their wheat acres every year,” the farmer speaking on condition of anonymity said.

He has concerns about the practice. “I think farmers need to realize that all of the chemicals we use are ‘bad’ to some extent,” he said. “Monsanto has done such an effective job marketing glyphosate as ‘safe’ and ‘biodegradable’ that farmers here still believe this even though such claims are false.”

The vast majority of farmers in Manitoba, Canada’s third largest wheat producing province, also use glyphosate on wheat, said Gerald Wiebe, a farmer and agricultural consultant. “I would estimate that 90 to 95 percent of wheat acres in Manitoba are sprayed pre-harvest with glyphosate; the exception would be in dry areas of the province where moisture levels at harvest time are not an issue,” he said.

“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Policy

According to Tom Ehrhardt, co-owner of Minnesota-based Albert Lea Seeds, sourcing grains not desiccated with glyphosate prior to harvest is a challenge.

“I have talked with millers of conventionally produced grain and they all agree it’s very difficult to source oats, wheat, flax and triticale, which have not been sprayed with glyphosate prior to harvest,” he said. “It’s a ‘don’t ask, don’t tell policy’ in the industry.”

Ehrhardt also says that crops grown to produce seed are not usually sprayed with glyphosate prior to harvest because this can damage seed germination.

Grain Millers, which has grain processing facilities in the U.S. and Canada, announced last year that it would not buy oats from Canada that had been desiccated with glyphosate. The company’s Canadian procurement manager, Terry Tyson, told Western Producer that glyphosate disrupts the natural maturing process and starch development, resulting in lower quality flakes and flour. He said the decision had nothing to do with health or safety concerns.

“Would Rather Not Eat a Loaf of Bread With Glyphosate In It”

Still, there are obvious concerns about glyphosate getting into food products.

“We are told these (glyphosate residues) are too small to matter but can we believe that?” the Saskatchewan farmer asked. “I think everyone, even farmers that use and love glyphosate, would rather not eat a loaf of bread with glyphosate in it.”

Wiebe shares similar concerns. “Consumers don’t realize when they buy wheat products like flour, cookies and bread they are getting glyphosate residues in those products,” he said. “It’s barbaric to put glyphosate in food a few days before you harvest it.”

Wiebe believes the use of glyphosate on wheat may be connected to the rise in celiac disease. “We’ve seen an explosion of gluten intolerance,” he said. “What’s really going on?”

“Can you imagine the public’s response if they knew that glyphosate is being sprayed on the oats in their Cheerios only weeks before it is manufactured?” Ehrhardt asked.

Residues of glyphosate have been found in wheat flour. Last year, Ransom reported to the U.S. Wheat Quality Council that tests on flour samples from the U.S. and Canada found that all had traces of glyphosate. However, Ransom said these were well below the maximum residue limits for glyphosate in wheat, which are 30 parts per million in the U.S.

Still, Ransom said: “I wouldn’t be surprised if someone repeated the test and found traces also.”

In response to mounting concerns over the escalating use of glyphosate, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently said it would begin testing foods for glyphosate residues.

Powerful Effect on Food System

Along with wheat and oats, glyphosate is used to desiccate a wide range of other crops including lentils, peas, non-GMO soybeans, corn, flax, rye, triticale, buckwheat, millet, canola, sugar beets and potatoes. Sunflowers may also be treated pre-harvest with glyphosate, according to the National Sunflower Association.

Benbrook says that a large portion of edible beans grown in Washington and Idaho are desiccated with glyphosate.

There are no statistics kept on the number of acres of wheat or other crops that are desiccated with glyphosate, according to Ransom.

While the pre-harvest use of glyphosate may account for a small amount of overall use of the herbicide, Benbrook says this still has a huge impact. “It may be two percent of agriculture use, but well over 50 percent of dietary exposure,” he said.

Further, he said: “I don’t understand why Monsanto and the food industry don’t voluntarily end this practice. They know it contributes to high dietary exposure (of glyphosate).”

Wiebe sees the situation in dire terms. “The most tragic thing is that industry is encouraging the use of glyphosate on wheat, farmers are using it, consumers are unaware of it and it’s having a powerful effect on the food system,” he said.

References

1. Romano RM, Romano MA, Bernardi MM, Furtado PV, Oliveira CA. “Prepubertal exposure to commercial formulation of the herbicide Glyphosate alters testosterone levels and testicular morphology.” Arch Toxicol. 2010;84:309-317.

2. Awad A. Shehata, Wieland Schrodl, Alaa. A. Aldin, Hafez M. Hafez, Monika Kruger. “The Effect of Glyphosate on Potential Pathogens and Beneficial Members of Poultry Microbiota In Vitro” Curr Microbiol. Dec 9, 2012.

3. Mañas F., Peralta L., Raviolo J., et al. “Genotoxicity of glyphosate assessed by the Comet assay and cytogenic tests.” Env Toxicol Pharmacol. 2009; 28:37–41.

4. Antoniou M., Habib MEM, Howard CV, et al. “Teratogenic effects of glyphosate-based herbicides: Divergence of regulatory decisions from scientific evidence.” J Env Anal Toxicol. 2012;S4:006. doi:10.4172/2161-0525.S4-006.

5. Benbrook, C. “Trends in glyphosate herbicide use in the United States and globally.” Environmental Sciences Europe (2016, 28:28) DOI: 10.1186/s12302-016-0070-0.

6. Arnason, Robert. “Oat buyer says no glyphosate pre-harvest.” Western Producer. April 22, 2015.

7. Gillam, Carey. “Fears Over Roundup Herbicide Prompts Testing Of Cereals, Breastmilk, and More.” Reuters News Service. April 10, 2015.

8. Gillam, Carey. “FDA to Start Testing for Glyphosate in Food.” Civil Eats. February 17, 2016.

9. “Preharvest Staging Guide.”

10. eu. “Clarification of Preharvest use of Glyphosate.”

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Conocimiento, Consciencia, Educacion

Robotic Bees to pollinate Monsanto Crops

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Pollinators participate in the sexual-reproduction of plants.

When you eat an almond, beet, watermelon or sip on coffee, you’re partaking of an ancient relationship between pollinators and flowers.

But since the 1990s, worldwide bee health has been in decline and most evidence points to toxic pesticides created by Shell and Bayer and the loss of genetic biodiversity due to the proliferation of GMO monocrops created in laboratories by biotech companies like Monsanto.

But never worry, those real life pollinators – the birds and the bees, as they say – may soon be irrelevant to the food needs of civilization.

Harvard roboticists are developing a solution to the crisis: swarms of tiny robot bees made of titanium and plastic that can pollinate those vast dystopian fields of GMO cash crops.

 

The Harvard Microrobotics Lab has been working on its Micro Air Vehicles Project since early 2009.

Borrowing from the biomechanics and social organization of bees, the team of researchers is undergoing the creation of tiny winged robots to fly from flower to flower, immune to the toxins dripping from petals, to spread pollen.

They even believe that they will soon be able to program the robobees to live in an artificial hive, coordinate algorithms and communicate amongst themselves about methods of pollination and location of particular crops.  

Of course, published reports from the lab also describe potential military uses – surveillance and mapping – but the dime-sized cyber-bees have yet to be outfitted with neurotoxin tipped stingers.

If you think this bee news is strange, be sure to check out this below recent article from the newswire: Anarchist Beekeepers Claim Responsibility for U.S. Drone Attack.


Anarchist Beekeepers

Claim Responsibility for U.S. Drone Attack
10 April 2013
from EarthFirstNews Website


The Earth First! Journal office received this short video in which a group of self described anarchist beekeepers take credit for a recent attack on a media drone by a swarm of bees.

The video appears to come from a camera mounted on the drone itself. In a separate communiqué, the group taking responsibility say they hacked the news corporation to access the footage. At the end of the video you will see an image of the drone itself.

In several instances one can see individual bees land on the lens of the camera. It looks as though the bees swarm the vehicle and bring it down.

It is difficult to tell if anyone was injured during the attack.

 
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Monsanto blamed for contributing to the dwindling bee population

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Monsanto, the massive biotechnology company being blamed for contributing to the dwindling bee population, has bought up one of the leading bee collapse research organizations.

Recently banned from Poland with one of the primary reasons being that the company’s genetically modified corn may be devastating the dying bee population, it is evident that Monsanto is under serious fire for their role in the downfall of the vital insects.

It is therefore quite apparent why Monsanto bought one of the largest bee research firms on the planet.

It can be found in public company reports hosted on mainstream media that Monsanto scooped up the Beeologics firm back in September, 2011. During this time the correlation between Monsanto’s GM crops and the bee decline was not explored in the mainstream, and in fact it was hardly touched upon until Polish officials addressed the serious concern amid the monumental ban.

Owning a major organization that focuses heavily on the bee collapse and is recognized by the USDA for their mission statement of,

“restoring bee health and protecting the future of insect pollination” could be very advantageous for Monsanto.

In fact, Beelogics’ company information states that the primary goal of the firm is to study the very collapse disorder that is thought to be a result – at least in part – of Monsanto’s own creations.

Their website states:

While its primary goal is to control the Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV) infection crises, Beeologics’ mission is to become the guardian of bee health worldwide.

What’s more, Beelogics is recognized by the USDA, the USDA-ARS, the media, and ‘leading entomologists’ worldwide.

The USDA, of course, has a great relationship with Monsanto. The government agency has gone to great lengths to ensure that Monsanto’s financial gains continue to soar, going as far as to give the company special speed approval for their newest genetically engineered seed varieties. It turns out that Monsanto was not getting quick enough approval for their crops, which have been linked to severe organ damage and other significant health concerns.

Steve Censky, chief executive officer of the American Soybean Association, states it quite plainly. It was a move to help Monsanto and other biotechnology giants squash competition and make profits.

After all, who cares about public health?

‘It is a concern from a competition standpoint,’ Censky said in a telephone interview.

It appears that when Monsanto cannot answer for their environmental devastation, they buy up a company that may potentially be their ‘experts’ in denying any such link between their crops and the bee decline.

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Bayer CropScience and Bee Deaths

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The Big Picture

For several years now there has been a dramatic loss of bees in Europe and North America.

As many as 50% to 90% of the bee populations have simply vanished. This is a big deal.


Bees are a keystone species – they are vital to the food chain on our planet. An international study of 115 food crops grown in over 200 countries showed that 75% of crops are pollinated by animals, especially by bees.

At first it was believed that only honeybees were affected, but then bumblebee populations began to decline.

The crisis was eventually given a name: Colony Collapse Disorder or CCD.


CCD is Not a Disease

There were initially several theories about the cause of CCDE, including,

However, it has now been proven that the bee deaths are actually the result of poisoning from two known pesticides called clothianidin and imidacloprid – manufactured by Bayer.

Imidacloprid, “Gaucho”

The trade name for clothianidin is Poncho.

The trade names for imidacloprid include,

  • Gaucho

  • Admire

  • Advantage

  • Merit

  • Amigo

  • Premise

  • Prothor

  • Winner


Why are They Used?

One of our most important crops is corn.

But corn has an enemy called diabrotica virgifera vergifera – also known as the “root worm.” It burrows into the roots of the corn plant and causes the plant to wither and eventually die.


Major infestations can wipe-out entire crops.

As bad as it sounds, the root worm problem can actually be addressed quite easily with the practice of crop rotation.

The larvae must feed on corn roots to survive and cannot travel more than 10 to 20 inches if hatched in a field rotated out of corn. However, rotating a field out of corn can result in lower farm profitability if there is less demand for the alternate crop.

So in 2003, Bayer Pharmaceutical introduced two pesticides, classified as neonicotinoids, to combat root worms and capitalize on increased farm profits. These pesticides are now two of Bayer’s top agricultural products – even though profits are at the expense of a keystone species.

Corn seed is coated with Bayer’s pesticides by means of an adhesive developed by another industry giant: Monsanto.

Despite studies which showed these pesticides are highly toxic to bees, their use was justified with the reasoning that the corn seed to which they were applied would be buried in the soil where it would presumably be harmless to other creatures. This was a grave mistake.

The first clue that Colony Collapse Disorder was the result of poisoning, similar to the DDT bird kill-off decades ago, was when clothianidin was used on corn crops in Germany’s state of Baden-Wurttemberg. In July of 2007, the German crop was infested with root worms.


The German government ordered that every possible method should be used to eradicate this pest, including the use of neonicotinoids. Shortly after the seeds were planted, in May of 2008, some 330-million bees abruptly died. The global phenomenon has continued to this day, resulting in millions of dead colonies… billions of dead bees.

An investigation revealed that the seed coating did not stay in the soil but was introduced to the air (and the rest of the plant) by simple abrasion – the rubbing together of seeds – as they are stored, moved and planted.

The German government quickly banned this pesticide, gave compensation to the farmers and issued a strong warning against using this chemical in agriculture.

According to the German Federal Agriculture Institute,

“It can unequivocally be concluded that poisoning of the bees is due to the rub-off of the pesticide ingredient clothianidin from corn seeds.”

According to the German Research Center for Cultivated Plants, 29 out of 30 dead bees had been killed, in the 2008 study, by direct contact with clothianidin.

Philipp Mimkes, spokesman for the German-based Coalition Against Bayer Dangers, said:

“We have been pointing out the risks of neonicotinoids for almost 10 years now. This proves without a doubt that the chemicals can come into contact with bees and kill them. These pesticides shouldn’t be on the market.”



More Research

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (May 30, 2003):

“Clothianidin has the potential for toxic chronic exposure to honey bees, as well as other non-target pollinators, through the translocation of clothianidin residue in nectar and pollen.”

“The fate and disposition of clothianidin in the environment suggest a compound that is asystemic insecticide that is persistent and mobile, stable to hydrolysis, and has potential to leach to ground water, as well as runoff to surface waters.”

“Clothianidin is highly toxic to honey bees on an acute contact basis (killing 50% of tested populations at greater than 389 mg/kg). It has the potential for toxic chronic exposure to honey bees, as well as other non-target pollinators, through the translocation of clothianidin residues in nectar and pollen.

In honey bees, the effects of this toxic chronic exposure may include lethal and/or sub-lethal effects in the larvae and reproductive effects in the queen.”

Bees can be exposed in two primary ways: through nectar from plants and through high-fructose corn syrup beekeepers use to feed their bees.

Since most U.S.-grown corn has been treated with imidacloprid, it’s also found in corn syrup.

The tragedy in Germany and France showed that bees exposed to clothianidin also infected bee colonies that were not harvesting corn pollen, thus spreading the toxin to regions some distance from cultivating corn plants. It is believed that affected bees could have become disoriented and mingled with bees from other colonies or contaminated the pollen of plants where other bee colonies were also pollinating.

There is also evidence that imidacloprid can produce colony collapse at levels far below those used in agriculture. In the summer of 2010, researchers conducted an in situ study in Worcester County, Massachusetts aimed at replicating how imidacloprid may have caused the CCD outbreak.

Over a 23-week period, they monitored bees in four different bee yards; each yard had four hives treated with different levels of imidacloprid and one control hive.
After 12 weeks of imidacloprid dosing, all the bees were alive. But after 23 weeks, 15 out of 16 of the imidacloprid-treated hives – 94% had died. Those exposed to the highest levels of the pesticide died first.

The characteristics of the dead hives were consistent with CCD; the hives were empty except for food stores, some pollen, and young bees, with few dead bees nearby.

When other conditions cause hive collapse, such as disease or pests, many dead bees are typically found inside and outside the affected hives.

Strikingly, it took only low levels of imidacloprid to cause hive collapse – less than what is typically used in crops or in areas where bees forage.


Neonicotinoids Result in Bee Colony Collapse

The tobacco industry once touted that smoking a few cigarettes doesn’t give a person lung cancer, which is arguably true.

Though today, nobody is fooled by this kind of double-speak regarding tobacco. Likewise, Bayer is quick to claim that feeding bees a specific amount of neonicotinoids, doesn’t kill the bees. This is more double-speak.

While trace amounts of neonicotinoids may not kill bees outright, they do interfere with the ability of bees to navigate to and from the hive.

This is exactly what beekeepers and farmers have been reporting: half empty or abandoned hives with no dead bodies to be found anywhere. It has also been noted that the empty colonies are absent the usual parasitic bugs that typically take advantage of an abandoned hive. The colonies appear sterile.

The pollen that they do manage to bring back to the hive is then further concentrated and exposed to the entire colony, causing suppression of their immune systems and subsequent infection by any number of parasites and pathogens.

People demonstrate against Bayer pesticides on behalf of bees

April 21st, 2007 at the Bayer headquarters in Brussels.

Billions of bees have died each year since Bayer

introduced Gaucho and Poncho pesticides to the market.

The poster reads: ’Gaucho Bayer, only kills if one uses it.’



What Has Bayer Done About It?

According to the Bayer website, they addressed the issue at Baden-Wurttemberg by holding,

“intensive discussions within the seed industry to develop measures for maintaining and monitoring the quality of seed coatings.”

Then their,

“second major step” was the “technical optimization of pneumatic sewing machines.”

Seriously?!? Yes.

In other words: they have given the problem thorough lip service without addressing the real problem: their pesticides. They even claim to help bees with other products…

As Bayer continues propagating the conspiracy theory that Varroa mites are the biggest problem facing bee hives, they have also conveniently developed a solution. Of course it is another pesticide. This one is called CheckMite+ and has some serious problems of its own.

Studies conducted on beeswax queen cups contaminated with CheckMite+ at various concentrations far below the allowable limits were catastrophic. Very few queens survived the graft, and those that did hatch were underweight and had problems mating.

So why is Bayer’s subterfuge allowed to continue?


Money Talks

The bottom line is that neonicotinoids account for much of Bayer’s agrochemical profits since over 90% of US corn acreage is treated with them – and Bayer’s influence is very strong in both science and politics, as demonstrated by their history…

Many people think of Bayer simply as the company that makes aspirin since that is how they were founded.

But they also produce many extremely toxic substances. In fact, Bayer was one of five companies that formed IG Farben in a 1925 merger. IG Farben was a huge Nazi supporter, and held the patent for the pesticide Zyklon B – which was used in Holocaust gas chambers.

They also owned 42.2 percent of the company which manufactured it.

Even more sickening, IG Farben used the Auschwitz facility to test its chemicals on human subjects.

In 1948, directors of IG Farben were indicted at a U.S. military tribunal, and at the subsequent Nuremberg Trials, where many were sentenced to prison for their horrible war crimes. Due to the severity of the crimes committed by IG Farben during World War II, the company was considered to be too corrupt to be allowed to continue to exist.

It was officially put into liquidation in 1952, but this does not mean the company ceased to be a legal entity. It continues even today as a corporation “in liquidation”, meaning that the purpose of the continuing existence of the corporation is being dissolved in an orderly fashion. Its shares are still traded on German markets.

Clearly too many powerful people stood to lose too much money if IG Farben had been liquidated immediately.

The same is true of Bayer, which was obviously allowed to continue operations (along with partners BASF and Agfa). After all, it would have been a shame to waste the profits from all that research. So now the world is once again faced with a Bayer holocaust – only this time it is against the earth’s bee population.

Bayer will stop at nothing to make a profit… when will they be held accountable?

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